Submissions

Southerly only accepts the unsolicited creative submissions of Australian and New Zealand writers. We quote a minimum twelve week turnaround on all work received. If you wish to enquire about the status of your submission, please wait until this twelve week period has lapsed.

Please read our guidelines before submitting. Questions and concerns can be addressed to submissions@southerlyjournal.com.au


‘Doesn’t a breath of the air that pervaded earlier days caress us as well? In the voices we hear, isn’t there an echo of now silent ones? . . . If so, then there is a secret agreement between past generations and the present one. Then our coming was expected on earth.’ (Walter Benjamin) What does it mean to be in secret agreement with people and places that came before? To recognize that coming after is a matter not just of influence, but also the taking on of certain obligations—for example, to return, to pay tribute, to make amends, to put to rest? How does the attempt to fulfill these obligations reconfigure the relationship between the past and the present, memory and forgetting, the living and the dead? Southerly 78.3 is interested in the forms of writing and creative expression that wrestle with the demands of trans-generational obligation. It begins with the assumption that our experience of the present is shaped by the unfinished business of events, forces and relationships that accompany our acts of remembrance and bind us to certain places, objects and things. What strategies of translation, remembrance or elegiac invocation can assist us to dramatize this unfinished business and thereby shed light on the myriad ways in which the past asks something of us?
‘Doesn’t a breath of the air that pervaded earlier days caress us as well? In the voices we hear, isn’t there an echo of now silent ones? . . . If so, then there is a secret agreement between past generations and the present one. Then our coming was expected on earth.’ (Walter Benjamin) What does it mean to be in secret agreement with people and places that came before? To recognize that coming after is a matter not just of influence, but also the taking on of certain obligations—for example, to return, to pay tribute, to make amends, to put to rest? How does the attempt to fulfill these obligations reconfigure the relationship between the past and the present, memory and forgetting, the living and the dead? Southerly 78.3 is interested in the forms of writing and creative expression that wrestle with the demands of trans-generational obligation. It begins with the assumption that our experience of the present is shaped by the unfinished business of events, forces and relationships that accompany our acts of remembrance and bind us to certain places, objects and things. What strategies of translation, remembrance or elegiac invocation can assist us to dramatize this unfinished business and thereby shed light on the myriad ways in which the past asks something of us?
Ends on March 1, 2018
‘Doesn’t a breath of the air that pervaded earlier days caress us as well? In the voices we hear, isn’t there an echo of now silent ones? . . . If so, then there is a secret agreement between past generations and the present one. Then our coming was expected on earth.’ (Walter Benjamin) What does it mean to be in secret agreement with people and places that came before? To recognize that coming after is a matter not just of influence, but also the taking on of certain obligations—for example, to return, to pay tribute, to make amends, to put to rest? How does the attempt to fulfill these obligations reconfigure the relationship between the past and the present, memory and forgetting, the living and the dead? Southerly 78.3 is interested in the forms of writing and creative expression that wrestle with the demands of trans-generational obligation. It begins with the assumption that our experience of the present is shaped by the unfinished business of events, forces and relationships that accompany our acts of remembrance and bind us to certain places, objects and things. What strategies of translation, remembrance or elegiac invocation can assist us to dramatize this unfinished business and thereby shed light on the myriad ways in which the past asks something of us?
Ends on March 1, 2018
‘Doesn’t a breath of the air that pervaded earlier days caress us as well? In the voices we hear, isn’t there an echo of now silent ones? . . . If so, then there is a secret agreement between past generations and the present one. Then our coming was expected on earth.’ (Walter Benjamin) What does it mean to be in secret agreement with people and places that came before? To recognize that coming after is a matter not just of influence, but also the taking on of certain obligations—for example, to return, to pay tribute, to make amends, to put to rest? How does the attempt to fulfill these obligations reconfigure the relationship between the past and the present, memory and forgetting, the living and the dead? Southerly 78.3 is interested in the forms of writing and creative expression that wrestle with the demands of trans-generational obligation. It begins with the assumption that our experience of the present is shaped by the unfinished business of events, forces and relationships that accompany our acts of remembrance and bind us to certain places, objects and things. What strategies of translation, remembrance or elegiac invocation can assist us to dramatize this unfinished business and thereby shed light on the myriad ways in which the past asks something of us?
Southerly is looking for a small number of essays and memoir, poems and short fiction on the theme of Comedy and Errors. From the laugh-out-loud to the wryly ironic, from biting satire to gag-a-minute, Southerly 77.3 Comedy & Errors considers comedy in all its forms. Comedy as genre, as a mode of cultural critique, as a reflection and a prediction, we want your work on textual laughs. We’re looking for diverse voices, historical perspectives and considerations of the role of comedy in the development of Australian literature.
Ends on October 31, 2017
Southerly is looking for a small number of essays and memoir, poems and short fiction on the theme of Comedy and Errors. From the laugh-out-loud to the wryly ironic, from biting satire to gag-a-minute, Southerly 77.3 Comedy & Errors considers comedy in all its forms. Comedy as genre, as a mode of cultural critique, as a reflection and a prediction, we want your work on textual laughs. We’re looking for diverse voices, historical perspectives and considerations of the role of comedy in the development of Australian literature.
Ends on October 31, 2017
Southerly is looking for a small number of essays and memoir, poems and short fiction on the theme of Comedy and Errors. From the laugh-out-loud to the wryly ironic, from biting satire to gag-a-minute, Southerly 77.3 Comedy & Errors considers comedy in all its forms. Comedy as genre, as a mode of cultural critique, as a reflection and a prediction, we want your work on textual laughs. We’re looking for diverse voices, historical perspectives and considerations of the role of comedy in the development of Australian literature.
Ends on October 31, 2017
Southerly is looking for a small number of essays and memoir, poems and short fiction on the theme of Comedy and Errors. From the laugh-out-loud to the wryly ironic, from biting satire to gag-a-minute, Southerly 77.3 Comedy & Errors considers comedy in all its forms. Comedy as genre, as a mode of cultural critique, as a reflection and a prediction, we want your work on textual laughs. We’re looking for diverse voices, historical perspectives and considerations of the role of comedy in the development of Australian literature.
Southerly only accepts the unsolicited creative submissions of Australian and New Zealand writers.

We quote a minimum twelve week turnaround on all work received. If you wish to enquire about the status of your submission, please wait until this twelve week period has lapsed.
Southerly only accepts the unsolicited creative submissions of Australian and New Zealand writers.

We quote a minimum twelve week turnaround on all work received. If you wish to enquire about the status of your submission, please wait until this twelve week period has lapsed.
Southerly only accepts the unsolicited creative submissions of Australian and New Zealand writers.

We quote a minimum twelve week turnaround on all work received. If you wish to enquire about the status of your submission, please wait until this twelve week period has lapsed.
Southerly only accepts the unsolicited creative submissions of Australian and New Zealand writers.

We quote a minimum twelve week turnaround on all work received. If you wish to enquire about the status of your submission, please wait until this twelve week period has lapsed.
Southerly only accepts the unsolicited creative submissions of Australian and New Zealand writers.

We quote a minimum twelve week turnaround on all work received. If you wish to enquire about the status of your submission, please wait until this twelve week period has lapsed.